• Shiant Islands
  • Shiant Islands
  • Shiant Islands
  • Canna
  • Rona and Rassay
  • Scarp
  • Skye
  • Soay
  • Islands in the Minch
  • Mousa, Shetland
  • Mousa Broch, Shetland
  • Papa Stour, Shetland
  • Sumburgh Head, Shetland

Scottish Islands

The Hebridean islands lying off the west coast of Scotland make for fantastic destinations and places to explore - spectacular sunsets, sea kayaking, stunning scenery and silver sands - the west coast Scottish Islands have it all.

To the north, Shetland and Orkney make equally great destinations with rugged scenery and steeped in history.

I'm starting this page with a few historical slides, beginning in Orkney and moving over to the Inner Hebrides, with updates featuring the Outer Hebrides and the Western Isles.

Enjoy the views, the vistas and the very best of Scotland.

If you'd like to search for particular images, either on this page or throughout my website, please use the search facility below...



And if you are interested in some of my images of Scottish islands for sale, please follow the link below to my Online Sales Page...

Scottish Islands


The Shiant Islands

25th June 2006


There's a great story as to how I came to be in the Minch, anchored off the Shiant islands on a beautiful, sunny morning in June. It involves mountain rescue, the Stornoway Coastguard tugboat and a NATO exercise...

If you're interested in finding out more, then follow the link below to read more in the blog.

Read the full Blog...

Garbh Eilean

Garbh Eilean

The natural harbour of Garbh Eilean and the cottage used by Adam Nicholson, the owner of the Shiants and the author of Sea Room.

Garbh Eilean

Galtachan outlying islands

Galtachan outlying islands

Eilean Mhuire

The Shiants

Elgol, Isle of Skye

April 2006


Elgol and the classic view across Loch Scavaig to the Skye Cuillin hills.


Loch Scavaig and the Cuillin ridge

Loch Scavaig and the Cuillin ridge

The Skye Cuillin hils as seen from Elgol.

The "Two Boys" of Elgol

The "Two Boys" of Elgol

Fishing boats on their moorings at Elgol.

Handa Island, Sutherland

July 2003


Owned by the Scottish Wildlife Trust, Handa Island is situated in North West Sutherland. On the north west coast of Handa, magnificent Torridonian cliffs, rising vertically from the Atlandtic, provide nesting locations for almost 100,000 seabirds.

Colonies of guillemots, razorbills and fulmars can bee seen nesting on the cliffs, whilst puffins have their burrows on high ledges, especially on the top of the Great Stac.


Handa Cliffs

Handa Cliffs

The Great Stac

Handa Cliffs

The Great Stac

The Great Stac

The cliffs of Handa on the west coast of the island rise some 100m out of the sea, providing nesting sites for colonies of seabirds during the spring and early summer.

Fulmar Chick

Puffin

Orkney

April 1990


Visited some 30 years ago, I will need to return back soon and update my collection... An historic series of images, these feature some of the rich history of Orkney.

From the Italian Chapel, to the rusting hulls of the scuttled fleet at Scapa Flow to the ancient remains of Skara Brae and the Standing Stones of Stenness.


Italian Chapel

Italian Chapel

Italian Chapel

The Italian Chapel is a highly ornate Catholic chapel on Lamb Holm in the Orkney Islands. It was built during World War II by Italian prisoners of war, who were housed on the previously uninhabited island while they constructed the Churchill Barriers to the east of Scapa Flow

Standing Stones of Stenness

Skara Brae

The Standing Stones of Stenness is a Neolithic monument five miles northeast of Stromness on the mainland of Orkney, Scotland which may be the oldest henge site in the British Isles.

Skara Brae is a stone-built Neolithic settlement, located on the Bay of Skaill on the west coast of Mainland Orkney.

Consisting of eight clustered houses, it was occupied from roughly 3180 BC to about 2500 BC and is Europe's most complete Neolithic village.

Scapa Flow

Scapa Flow

Scapa Flow

In late November 1918 the German High Seas Fleet arrived in Scapa Flow for internment. On 21 June 1919, believing the British intended to seize the fleet, Rear Admiral Ludwig von Reuter gave the order to scuttle every ship.

Today the wrecks of three battleships, three light cruisers and a fast mine-layer – ships that all escaped complete removal during salvage operations – remain on the seabed of Scapa Flow.





If you have enjoyed the photography on this page, then please feel free to share this post: